A Travellerspoint blog

Pepper Lunch

Pepper Lunch

Pepper Lunch is a famous restaurant chain in Japan which serves meat, mostly steaks. The brand was first established in Tokyo and since then has grown into a international fast food brand for steak. You can find Pepper Lunch in most big cities in Japan, however the further away from Tokyo you get, the harder it is to find a Pepper Lunch. Many Japanese people who goes to the restaurant for their cheap steak cuts. However, you have to remember that the Japanese diet is different from those outside of Japan so the portions are really small and might not be enough for you. Their most famous signature dish however is their beef pepper rice, which is rice served in an iron plate and topped with thin slices of beef covered in their signature pepper sauce. Not only is it nutritious because you get the meat, rice, corn and green onions but also cheap at 700 yen excluding tax. You can get a larger portion of rice if you add an extra 100 yen. They have a 900 yen version of it with extra meat but who really knows how much they add in it? If you ever come across a Pepper Lunch anywhere around the world and is craving for meat, it might be a good idea to head in for some steak and meat that would not hurt the wallet, especially in Japan.

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Posted by Ohana_Matsumae 23:18 Archived in Japan Tagged tokyo osaka food restaurant japan traditional vacation pub breakfast sweet world dinner bar tour tourist lunch cheap trip izakaya dumplings eating tourism meat noodle soup yummy yum eat delicious gourmet steak noodles authentic ramen tasty pepper nagoya foodie pepper_lunch miso foodporn dine aichi food_porn fine_dine doteni comfort_food a_la_carte kishimen vermicelli Comments (0)

Kishimen

Kishimen

Kishimen is a flat and thick-cut noodle dish famous in Nagoya. The broth is very refreshing because it is a mix between the Kansai and Kanto style of Japan. In the Kanto region, things a much more sweet while in the Kansai region, things are much more salty. In this case, you can taste the saltiness from the bonito flakes as well as the sweetness from the sake they used for seasoning in their broth. Usual toppings they put on their Kishimen in Nagoya are spinach, kamaboko, fried bean curds, to name a few. Not only is it an interesting dish but also a different twist to your knowledge about Japanese noodle dishes.

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Posted by Ohana_Matsumae 19:16 Archived in Japan Tagged osaka food restaurant japan traditional vacation pub sweet dinner bar tour tourist trip izakaya dumplings eating tourism noodle soup yummy yum eat delicious gourmet noodles authentic ramen tasty nagoya foodie miso foodporn dine aichi food_porn fine_dine doteni comfort_food a_la_carte kishimen vermicelli Comments (0)

Hitsumabushi

Hitsumabushi

When people talk about Japan, unagi (eel) is something that usually pops into people's mind. Like sushi, Japan is very famous for their unagi and usually the image we have its a tender slice of eel with sweet sauce over a bowl of Japanese rice. This well-known unagi dish originated from Shizuoka prefecture which is located two prefectures away from Tokyo towards the south. However, Nagoya seems to have taken the simple unagi dish to whole new level. Although it has been part of Nagoya tradition and not something new, Nagoya has their own different way of eating this delicacy, actually three. This unagi delicacy which they have in Nagoya is called "hitsumabushi." O-hitsu meaning the wooden bowl they put the rice in and then musubi is the noun form of musubu which is to cover, in this case covering the rice with unagi pieces. With the name out of the way, now let me guide you through the three ways of eating "hitsumabushi." The first way is to scoop some rice into a separate bowl provided and then eat it as it is. This first way you can really savour the real taste of the unagi and the rice. The second way is to scoop some rice into the bowl again like the first way but this time add some of the "yakumi" or seasoned toppings to it. The toppings are usually toasted seaweed, spring onions and wasabi. You then mix it all up and eat it together with the unagi and rice. The third and last way is to eat it "ochazuke" style. To those who have had "ochazuke" might already know how to eat it but for those who do not know, I will guide you through it step by step. First of all like the first and second way you scoop the unagi and rice into the bowl. The next step is to add the "yakumi" on to the unagi and rice like you did in the second way. The last step for this third way is to add the "o-dashi." Pour the "o-dashi" into your bowl of rice and devour everything along with the hot broth. So, which way is the best way to eat it? Well, usually you will have enough to test out all three of the ways of eating "hitsumabushi" and have left over portions in the "o-hitsu" for you to savour the last bits the style of your choice. So the next time you find yourself in Nagoya, make sure to try out their "hitsumabushi."

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Posted by Ohana_Matsumae 06:23 Archived in Japan Tagged food local japan culture history traditional locals adventure sweet famous cuisine taste explore yummy yum eat delicious udon discover eel noodles authentic hungry tasty nagoya local_food foodie shizuoka miso foodporn broth miso_nikomi_udon unagi hitsumabushi Comments (0)

Miso Nikomi Udon

Miso Nikomi Udon

Miso Nikomi Udon is one of Nagoya's most famous comfort foods. Ask anyone on the street and they will tell you that they know about the dish and love it. So, what makes the Miso Nikomi Udon so special than normal udon dishes in Japan? The answer would be the broth. The broth is made with Nagoya's famous Haccho miso, which has a stronger taste that white miso. This dish is very salty because the broth itself is made with bonito, soy sauce as well as Nagoya's famous Haccho miso paste. The soup is very thick, almost like a paste with various vegetables, rice cakes, chicken and egg as toppings. Locals usually have a side bowl to use as an eating vessel because eating the noodles in the hot clay pot is dangerous. Another thing locals like to do is order a side of white rice while they devour this dish and eat it like a side dish to the rice. This is somewhat a commoners' food and is a must try if you want to have what the locals have!

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Posted by Ohana_Matsumae 22:39 Archived in Japan Tagged food local japan culture history traditional locals adventure cuisine taste explore yummy yum eat delicious udon discover noodles authentic hungry tasty nagoya local_food foodie miso foodporn miso_nikomi_udon Comments (0)

Doteni

Doteni

The doteni is the Nagoya version of doteyaki (Osaka famous B class gourmet). Although both doteni and doteyaki are sweet and the colours look the same, the sauce is made from different ingredients. In this post I will be focusing on the comfort food of Nagoya, the doteni. Doteni is a dish where they simmer ingredients like daikon, beef innards and eggs to name a few; in a sweet Nagoya special Hatcho miso sauce. It is usually finished off with chopped scallions on the top and served as a la carte at izakayas. If you like sweet meat dishes then this is a must try the next time you visit Nagoya!

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Posted by Ohana_Matsumae 22:04 Archived in Japan Tagged osaka food restaurant japan traditional pub sweet dinner bar izakaya eating yummy yum eat delicious gourmet authentic tasty nagoya foodie miso foodporn dine food_porn fine_dine doteni comfort_food a_la_carte Comments (0)

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