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Entries about miso

Miso Katsu

Miso Katsu

Like all other parts of Japan, Aichi people are also fascinated with pork and what is a better way to eat pork than deep-frying them into cutlets like the rest of Japan? Now, here is the catch. Unlike other parts of Japan where they either serve it in tonkotsu sauce on the side or smother the whole dish with tonkotsu sauce, they dump a sweet miso sauce on to the cutlets. They bring out the deep-fried pork cutlets and the sweet miso sauce separately and pour the sauce on for you to your liking. If you want more sauce you can ask for more just by asking the servers. Although deep-fried pork cutlets isn't my favourite thing to eat in Japan, I do like the miso katsu. I find that the crispiness of the pork cutlet and the hot sweet miso sauce the pour on afterwards creates this perfect harmony and when you bite into it you can taste the meat, the breading and the sweetness from the miso sauce all in one bite. Not to mention that the miso sauce goes so well with the rice! If I ever visit Nagoya again, I would go and have it every day!

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Posted by Ohana_Matsumae 01:59 Archived in Japan Tagged snow food fish local salmon hiking japan travel adventure ski snowboard sweet famous romantic hot trip eats milk explore seafood meat bears hokkaido traveling sake taiwan journey cold yummy yum dessert otaru sapporo eat sushi delicious pork egg gourmet discover noodles oysters genghis ramen chow butter spicy tasty nagoya foodie fry niseko hakodate miso foodporn soup_curry genghis_khan kaisen_don seafood_don jigoku_ramen furano asahikawa hotate snow_festival yukimatsuri sapporo_tv_tower chanchanyaki robatayaki kaki aichi tonkatsu cutlet deep_fried Comments (0)

Tako Shabu

Tako Shabu

I have finally gotten the chance to travel to Wakkanai and try one of their local cuisines. One might think that it is not worth riding the train for 5+ hours from Sapporo just to get here to eat food when you can have it in Sapporo. Well let me tell you, somethings you can only eat in specific pRts of Hokkaido like the dish I am going o talk about in his blog, Tako Shabu. By hearing the name you can probably already imagine how the dish looks or what it is. Yes this dish is a hotpot dish but instead of the normal beef, you substitute it for tako. So for those who are beginners in Japanese, the word "tako" means octopus and yes you cook the Tako in the hotpot. As for the dipping sauce, it changes according to he restaurant you go to. The shop which I went to, the created their shabu dipping sauce with goma sauce, ponzu, white sesame seeds and other secret ingredients. If you want to ru the full experience of this wonderful dish I would suggest you guys to come up to Wakkanai and try it. Of course there are more wonderful dishes aside from this one. I will write about another local dish of this region in a future post.

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The restaurant I went to was called "Furusato" or ふる里 in Japanese. It is near he Dormy Inn which is close to Wakkanai station. Please come check it out. The two grannies here are super nice and will definitely brighten your day with their chatting and food.

Posted by Ohana_Matsumae 01:58 Archived in Japan Tagged tokyo osaka japan seafood hokkaido soup crab sapporo ice_cream sushi octopus curry shabu miso tako wakkanai Comments (0)

Kawara Soba

Kawara Soba

Kawara soba or roof-tile soba is a Yamaguchi prefecture delicacy. The soba is made of tea and that's what gives it the green colour. On top of the Kawara soba are tamago yaki shreds (omlette shreds), minced beef, spring onions, lemon slice and shredded seaweed. So why is it called roof-tile soba? The reason for this is because it is served on a roof-tile. If you are looking for something interesting to eat, come drop by Shimonoseki, Yamaguchi prefecture and try this out!

Kawara soba with Fugu Karaage and Fugu-jiru

Kawara soba with Fugu Karaage and Fugu-jiru

PS: Fugu Karaage is also another famous dish among locals. I will talk more about it in a future post about this delicacy.

Posted by Ohana_Matsumae 03:15 Archived in Japan Tagged food japan history tea green cuisine onions meat soup beef seaweed fugu lemon chá gourmet tofu noodles shredded soba miso musashi yamaguchi shimonoseki kawara miso_soup miso_jiru karaage miyamoto ocha shred tamagoyaki tamago mince minced spring_onions delicacy roof-tile Comments (0)

Mapo Yakisoba

Mapo Yakisoba

Mapo Yakisoba is one of many soul food people who live in the prefecture Miyagi eat. What makes this dish so interesting is that other parts of Japan has never thought of adding Mapo Tofu to noodles, only rice. The yakisoba is just plain yakisoba with no sauce or topping. Over the yellowish noodles they pour the hot and spicy Mapo Tofu on top, completely covering up all of the noodles until you can only see Mapo Tofu and the red sauce. I prefer eating this as to the traditional Mapodofu don because not only its something fresh to me but also it goes better with yakisoba in my opinion.

Mapo Yakisoba

Mapo Yakisoba

Posted by Ohana_Matsumae 03:41 Archived in Japan Tagged snow food japan history hotel cow ice resort hot milk power miyajima beef cold tohoku onsen tongue tofu noodles ramen spicy sendai matsushima miso yakisoba miyagi mapo mapo_tofu mapodofu gyutan sengoku date_masamune Comments (0)

Jaja-men

Jaja-men

Jaja-men is what we westerners know as Jajangmyeong, a Korean noodle dish. In Korea they use a thick noodle made from white wheat flour while the sauce made from dark soybean paste. However the infamous B class gourmet dish of Iwate prefecture, Jaja-men is a little different from its Chinese and Korean counterparts. The noodles used for Morioka Jaja-men is similar to those of udon but however the paste is a mixture of meat and miso paste served along with cucumbers. Before mixing and eating, local people of Morioka like to add 2 rounds of vinegar, 1 round of chili oil, grated garlic and grated ginger. After mixing everything together Bon appetite. If the flavour is not strong enough, you may add more according your taste. After your finished use a slice of pickled ginger to crap everyone in the bowl into the middle then crack a raw egg into the bowl. Beat the egg well and call a waiter over and say "chi-tan kudasai", they will add hot soup into your bowl which will cook the egg. You can drink the soup immediately after the soup is added.

Jaja-men

Jaja-men

Chi-tan after Jaja-men

Chi-tan after Jaja-men

PS: It is ok to have noodles left over for Chi-tan.

Posted by Ohana_Matsumae 03:03 Archived in Japan Tagged snow japan ice festival seafood meat hokkaido cold tohoku bean sushi udon noodles ramen sauce morioka miso iwate jajamen jajangmyeon Comments (0)

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