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Sauce Katsu Don (Fukui style) and Oroshi Soba

Sauce Katsu Don (Fukui style) and Oroshi Soba

This dish is pretty well known all over Japan and 3 of its prefectures: Gunma, Nagano and Fukui all has their own signature way of making this great dish. In this blog post I'll be talking about specifically the Fukui style sauce Katsu don. So what is sauce katsu don? Well, to know about that you first have to know what a katsu don is. A katsu don is basically deep fried pork cutlet over rice. Usually they like to use a thick cut of pork sirloin to make the cutlet and then batter it and covering it with panko bread crumbs before deep frying it. Now sauce katsu don is basically the same thing but the deep fried pork cutlet itself is dipped in a sweet sauce (the sauce varies depending on the region you're eating it). In the Fukui style sauce katsudon, they have 3 slices of katsu (2 pieces of pork thigh meat cutlet and 1 piece of pork sirloin cutlet). Since the pork cutlets are thinly sliced, the meat stays juicy and tender but also maintain the crispiness from the deep-frying.

Oroshi soba is another really famous dish in Fukui. It is basically cold soba noodles with grated radish and katsuo as toppings. Unlike the normal type of soba where you have a sauce dish and you're suppose to take some noodles and dip it in, here you pour the sauce right in to the soba noodle dish itself and eat it. At the end you can pour the remaining juice in the soba plate to the sobayu (the water they boiled the soba in) and drink it.

  • Important: Some restaurants might have sobayu provided and some not.

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Posted by Ohana_Matsumae 21:21 Archived in Japan Tagged tokyo osaka umeda japan rice chicken seafood meat beef seaweed kaiyukan uni udon curry bowl ramen sauce okonomiyaki fukui soba namba takoyaki nipponbashi shinsaibashi tempura beni_shouga gyudon kushi_katsu tsutenkaku nori natto katsudon echizen oroshi radish daikon katsuo tare Comments (0)

Sara-udon

Sara-udon

In Nagasaki prefecture there is a mysterious dish called Sara-udon. Though this dish seems to be everywhere you go in Nagasaki, the easiest place to find it will be the Chinatown in Nagasaki city. This dish consists of noodles covered in a clear-whitish ankake sauce with seafood, veggies, pork and kamaboko. If you think of it, it kind of resembles another dish in Chinese cuisine called the Cantonese-style Chow Mein. The only difference between this dish and the Cantonese-style Chow Mein is that you can choose your noodles. There are two types of noodles you could choose from, number one is a thick type noodle (champon noodles) while the other one is a thin and crunchy type noodle. Though the default is the thin and crunchy type, some local Nagasaki people like the thick type noodles more. The correct way to devour this delicacy is to pour worcester sauce over it first then eat it. A lot of tourists over look this dish because they think of Japan as only famous for sushi (sashimi), ramen and kobe beef. However this is not true. There is more to Japanese cuisine than just sushi, sashimi, ramen and kobe beef and this dish here is one full of taste and history. If you drop by Nagasaki, this dish is a must try.

Sara-udon I had in one of the restaurant in Nagasaki's Chinatown.

Sara-udon I had in one of the restaurant in Nagasaki's Chinatown.

Posted by Ohana_Matsumae 05:32 Archived in Japan Tagged fish fishing mountain white port nagasaki cabbage seafood kobe beef tram vegetables atomic bomb shrimp sushi pork prawns fat kyushu noodles ramen sashimi thick worcester sauce veggies dejima inasa thin castella crunchy nightview beansprouts ankake kamaboko Comments (0)

Jaja-men

Jaja-men

Jaja-men is what we westerners know as Jajangmyeong, a Korean noodle dish. In Korea they use a thick noodle made from white wheat flour while the sauce made from dark soybean paste. However the infamous B class gourmet dish of Iwate prefecture, Jaja-men is a little different from its Chinese and Korean counterparts. The noodles used for Morioka Jaja-men is similar to those of udon but however the paste is a mixture of meat and miso paste served along with cucumbers. Before mixing and eating, local people of Morioka like to add 2 rounds of vinegar, 1 round of chili oil, grated garlic and grated ginger. After mixing everything together Bon appetite. If the flavour is not strong enough, you may add more according your taste. After your finished use a slice of pickled ginger to crap everyone in the bowl into the middle then crack a raw egg into the bowl. Beat the egg well and call a waiter over and say "chi-tan kudasai", they will add hot soup into your bowl which will cook the egg. You can drink the soup immediately after the soup is added.

Jaja-men

Jaja-men

Chi-tan after Jaja-men

Chi-tan after Jaja-men

PS: It is ok to have noodles left over for Chi-tan.

Posted by Ohana_Matsumae 03:03 Archived in Japan Tagged snow japan ice festival seafood meat hokkaido cold tohoku bean sushi udon noodles ramen sauce morioka miso iwate jajamen jajangmyeon Comments (0)

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